Lawn Care Advice for the Spring Season

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Although the cold weather might not be over yet, it’s never too early to start thinking about your lawn care advice & routine for the spring season. There are a few things you can do now to get your lawn ready for warmer weather. In this blog post, we will provide some tips on how to get your lawn ready for the spring season. Keep reading for more information!

1. Plant Cool-Season Grasses

The first thing you should do is plant lawn seed. There are several types of seed to choose from, so ask your local nursery which kind would be best for your area. Cool-season grasses grow in the cooler months, so these should be planted in the fall or early spring. If you have a Bermuda or hybrid grass lawn, wait until around late February before planting any seeding. Don’t forget to fertilize your newly planted seeds!

2. Aerate If Needed

If you struggle with soil that has compacted spots or that doesn’t drain properly, then it might be time to aerate. This will allow water to get down into the roots and help grass stay healthy all year long.

3. Apply Pre-Emergent Herbicides Now

Pre-emergent herbicide prevents all kinds of weeds from growing in your lawn, so if you apply it before the seeds sprout, you won’t have to worry about them later on. These products can be found at most home improvement stores and they are very easy to use – literally sprinkle them on your lawn and water them down! It’s also a good idea to re-apply this product each time you overseed or after it rains. Pre-emergent herbicide is not necessary if you don’t want to use it, just remember that there will be an increase in weed growth until the seed has grown into new grass.

4. Fertilization Is Key!

The fertilizer of choice is slow-release nitrogen, which feeds the grass for months at a time. Spread it around your lawn with a spreader and water it down after applying. You can find “nitrogen only” or you can find this type of fertilizer blended with other nutrients that your lawn might also need. If you would like to fertilize more than once in the spring, do so about 3-4 weeks apart from each other. One thing to remember is not to put down too much – if you see white spots on your lawn, then you’ve applied too much!

5. Mow High Now, Lower Later

Most people cut their grass too short; the proper height is about 2 inches high. If you set your mower to cut higher than this, it will promote healthier grass growth. Although you should mow low during the hot months because heat plus long grass equals brown spots on your lawn, there’s no need to do that now.

6. Get Rid Of That Moss!

We know it’s pretty and all, but moss can take over your lawn if left unattended for too long. Use a broom or shop-vac to remove as much of it as possible before applying an herbicide made specifically for killing off moss. After ridding yourself of these pesky plants, use weed killer to kill any other weeds growing in the area where you removed the moss. Now would be a great time to double check all of your lawn’s sprinkler heads too, because a lot can go wrong with them during the winter months.

7. Fix Broken Sprinklers!

Broken or leaky sprinkler heads waste water and money. Although they might not seem like a very important part of lawn care advice, there is nothing more frustrating than a malfunctioning sprinkler. To fix a broken head, simply turn off the water going to that zone and unscrew it from the ground. Purchase a new one that is compatible with your current system and then screw it into the ground again – once you’ve turned the water back on, you should be good to go! If these simple steps aren’t enough help for you to get your spring season started right, give us a call and we will be more than happy to help you with any problems that might be plaguing your lawn. From fertilizer recommendations to sprinkler repair, our experts are here for you!

8. Watch Out For Crab Grass

It’s beginning to look a lot like… crab grass! If you have this grass in your lawn, it will start to grow when the weather starts heating up. Crabgrass is very common, so don’t feel bad if you have it growing in your yard. Your best line of defense is pre-emergent herbicide, which will keep these sprouts from ever showing up in your turf. However, there are other ways to get rid of crabgrass – most homeowners opt for contact killers because they kill on contact instead of having to wait until the weed has already grown. This type of herbicide can be sprayed onto any weeds that come into contact with them and they’ll die within 24 hours. Contact weed killers usually take a few days to work, so it’s best to plan ahead for this one.

9. Keep Irrigation In Check

Summertime means you’ll be watering your lawn every day, but that is not the case during springtime. Irrigation can prevent warm season grasses from germinating and growing because they are constantly being watered down – to avoid this, water early in the morning or late at night when temperatures are cooler. Instead of using sprinkler systems, opt for drip irrigation. These systems give off smaller amounts of water compared to sprinklers, which will make sure your lawn doesn’t get burned by too much H2O at once. If you have any questions regarding irrigation, don’t hesitate to give us a call!

10. Go Easy On The Fertilizer

Spring is the best time to fertilize your lawn because it’s when grass grows the most. However, you should not apply too much of it at once. Instead use an organic slow-release nitrogen/potassium fertilizer (16-2-4). Although you can still use a weed and feed product now, there won’t be many weeds popping up so it’s not really necessary.

John Mayyer

John Mayyer is a General Blogger & writer who has been extensively writing in the technology field for a few years. He has written several articles which have provided exciting and knowledgeable information. He is a web content writer, and guest blogger, who offers unique and professional content writing services to online business entrepreneurs.

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